InvestiDate - How to Investigate Your Date
RSS Follow Become a Fan

Categories

Craigslist
Criminal & Dating
Drugs & Dating
Employment & Dating
Funny & Dating
Health & Dating
Lying & Dating
Money & Datng
Mood & Dating
Photos & Dating
Public Records & Dating
Study & Dating
Stylish & Dating

Archives

August 2016
January 2016
May 2015
January 2015
August 2014
July 2014
April 2014
February 2014
December 2013
October 2013
August 2013
June 2013
January 2013
October 2012
August 2012
July 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011

powered by

Clues (blog)

Fake marine pleads guilty to cyberstalking his online dates

A North Carolina man pretending to be a U.S. Marine on online dating sites and allegedly threatened women who refused to send him nude or seductive pictures of themselves has pleaded guilty to cyberstalking and making threats, The Washington Post is reporting.

James M. Johnson, 29, pleaded guilty, according to a statement from the office of U.S. Attorney Neil H. MacBride. Johnson now faces up to five years for each count at a sentencing scheduled on Nov. 2.

Johnson admitted to setting up dating profiles using a fake name, personal information and photos of a Marine — often using the screen name “Cuddleman.” He contacted at least 11 women in the mid-Atlantic region, urging them to send him photos or pose in front of a Web cam. When the women refused, authorities say, Johnson threatened to sexually assault them, kill their children, and post altered photos of them on pornographic Web sites.

If you've met someone online and you're unsure if he or she's in the military, make sure to check archives.gov and stolenvalor.com for more direction. Fake military scams are rampant these days -- from college women to  retirees, women (and men) of all ages are being swindled my fake military personnel (click here for more tips on what to look out for).

If you think you've been a victim of a fake military scam, your best bet is to contact the Federal Trade Commission at 1-877-ID-THEFT.